Categories
Entertainment Music

Watch: Beano French talks BET, Rents Due, and Philadelphia's Musical History

The westside is looking like the best side.

Beano French is a singer/songwriter from West Philadelphia. I recently caught up with him, we chopped it up about his music, his video premiering on BET, and what’s next for him.
Beano began taking singing seriously within the last few years and has produced one hell of a R&B project. The vocalist worked exclusively with the skillful, Dilemma to produce “Just Beano.” Which is also his former stage name; The transition represents his growth as an artist. The EP that took a little under a year to complete debuted at No. 4 on the iTunes R&B charts and climbed to the No. 5 slot on Billboard’s Middle Atlantic Heatseekers chart. He performed his popular song “Monday Morning” on The Q on Fox and sold out CODA Philly. With all of the buzz surrounding him, Beano sits down to talk with me.
%CODE31%
Check out the interview above and enjoy the sound of Beano French’s “Just Beano” below
%CODE32%

Categories
Entertainment Interview Music

Watch: Beano French talks BET, Rents Due, and Philadelphia’s Musical History

The westside is looking like the best side.

Beano French is a singer/songwriter from West Philadelphia. I recently caught up with him, we chopped it up about his music, his video premiering on BET, and what’s next for him.

Beano began taking singing seriously within the last few years and has produced one hell of a R&B project. The vocalist worked exclusively with the skillful, Dilemma to produce “Just Beano.” Which is also his former stage name; The transition represents his growth as an artist. The EP that took a little under a year to complete debuted at No. 4 on the iTunes R&B charts and climbed to the No. 5 slot on Billboard’s Middle Atlantic Heatseekers chart. He performed his popular song “Monday Morning” on The Q on Fox and sold out CODA Philly. With all of the buzz surrounding him, Beano sits down to talk with me.

Check out the interview above and enjoy the sound of Beano French’s “Just Beano” below.

Categories
Music

Why do WE Care so Much About the Grammys?

After major backlash from the 59th Grammy awards, it seems as if the Academy has had a change of heart in just a year’s time. The Nominees for the 60th Annual Grammy awards have surfaced and artists are finally in the categories they belong in. But why? Why did it take the complaints of millions of viewers for the Academy to correctly place artists where they deserve to be.
More importantly, why do we equate the Grammys to a musical pinnacle? Why don’t people who feel they are left out create a lane of their own? One notion that I cannot understand is why a BET award is not as deeply revered as a Grammy.  Artists usually use the BET awards as a stepping stone and then move on to the MTV and VH1 awards and subsequently the Grammys. This is the ladder of importance to artists.  One that doesn’t make much sense. We care too much about being accepted by people that can hardly understand our art.
 

J. Cole said it best in Fire Squad:
“History repeats itself and that’s just how it goes
Same way that these rappers always bite each others flows
Same thing that my n*gga Elvis did with Rock n Roll
Justin Timberlake, Eminem and then Macklemore
While silly n*ggas argue over who gon’ snatch the crown
Look around, my n*gga, white people have snatched the sound This year I’ll prolly go to the awards dappered down
Watch Iggy win a Grammy as I try to crack a smile.
Pictured above, some of Hip-Hop’s most influential artists decided not to attend the 1989 Grammy Awards. In 1988 Will Smith and Jazzy Jeff won a Grammy for Best Rap Performance. However, the win was not televised. We can only imagine why. No matter the reason, these instances of unfair treatment continue to transform and resurface. So now the question is no longer, “Why are we not included?” It has become “Why do we want to be included?”
 
Stop seeking acceptance and stop accepting marginalization.

Categories
Music

What a Time to be From Philly

The BET Hip-Hop Awards was a star-studded showcase of the many forms of hip-hop. In tradition, the show was opened with a cypher of some of the hottest rappers out and some newcomers, ready to shuffle up the game. Lil Wayne, even blessed the mic. A Boogie, Don Q, Jidenna, Kent Jones, and Nick Grant all spit fire no one could put out.

cypher-small.jpg

If you’re a Philly native like myself, you couldn’t help but notice we were heavily represented from the beginning to the end of the show. In this necessary cypher, the legendary hip-hop group known as State Property let everybody know they still got it. Freeway, Neef Buck, Peedi Crack, Beanie Sigel, and Omillio Sparks brought back that gritty, hood rap that the industry has been missing. Get a load of the reintroduction below.

 %CODE1%

That’s not all.
The spotlight was not off of Philly artists just yet. Kur, Ms. Jade, and Empire’s Yazz The Greatest, and Bre-Z put on for our city. Alongside Dave East, Young M.A, and Sam Black, Kur and Ms. Jade held their own with unforgettable bars. Pay attention to Kur he is moving strategically through the music industry and is set to release an album titled “Shakur” in a few weeks.

The most important cypher of the night included the self and critically acclaimed Best Rapper Alive, Lil Wayne, and the crowd favorite, Chocolate Droppa. Now, I know you guys are probably thinking, “Siani who is Chocolate Droppa?” He’s Philly comedian Kevin Hart’s rapper alter-ego. While Mr. Hart is from Philly, Droppa hails from Cumberland, KY.

2016-10-06 (7).png

See what I was saying? A night full of familiar faces. Philly, our city is on the rise and it’s up to us to support our local artists to be all they can be.
I mean you never know, you could be the next big thing to blow.